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Frontiers in Mitochondrial Medicine Trainee Workshop & Open Symposium (Co-hosted by PRiME and mitoNET)
May 26, 10:00 AM EDT
Leslie Dan Pharmacy Building

This event will bring together researchers and trainees in the PRiME and mitoNET communities at the University of Toronto.  The day will include a morning workshop for trainees with a panel discussion about opportunities in the precision and mitochondrial medicine spaces, followed by an afternoon symposium open to the entire community, which will feature keynote leactures from Prof. Mike Murphy (University of Cambridge) and Dr. Aaron Schimmer (Princess Margaret Cancer Centre). 

 

PRiME: A Precision Medicine initiative at the University of Toronto

PRiME was launched at the University of Toronto in 2019 (prime.utoronto.ca). PRiME brings together over 150 innovators from the Faculties of Pharmacy, Engineering, Arts & Science, and Medicine.  These world-class scientists, engineers, and clinicians provide the research breadth and excellence to develop new solutions in drug discovery, diagnostics, and disease biology. With a multidisciplinary approach that goes beyond genomics and mutational profiling, PRiME is an accelerator of new discoveries and novel solutions that will deliver on the promise of Precision Medicine.

 

mitoNET: a Strategic Initiative of the University of Toronto

The Canada Mitochondrial Network.  mitoNET, is an emerging network of researchers, clinicians, patients and advocates, academic institutions, NGOs and industry partners working together with a common mission - to transform our understanding of the role of mitochondria in human health and disease, including both rare and common chronic diseases affecting mood, metabolism, longevity and quality of life.  Together with its partners, mitoNET aims to deliver supporting technologies, integrative platforms, and interdisciplinary knowledge that will lead to a paradigm shift in the way clinicians approach the diagnosis and treatment of disease and consider the potential role of mitochondrial dysfunction in multiple and prevalent medical conditions.